Create a Hirable “About Me” Page

photographer resume

Amazing websites, get you hired. There is no surprise in that statement, but what you may not consider is your “About Me” page may be the deciding factor is a client reaching out to work with you and not your spectacular portfolio slide. With an over saturation of creatives nowadays, brands, businesses, and recruiters (such as myself!) look for talent that stems beyond the camera work. We want to hire people who are professional and relatable – someone who we will enjoy working with on important projects. 

That introduction and trust start on your “About” page. Convince them that they want to hire you and not your camera set up and you are guaranteed to land more opportunities. Here are a few tips to get you started. 

 

Introduce yourself with a professional photo, video, or gif…

 

Consider your about page as a way of shaking a potential client’s hand and introducing yourself (elbows if we are still in COVID!) Although we never judge a book by it’s cover – your style, approachability, and initial impression will connect website viewers, ultimately converting them into clients. 

Whether it is a boomerang throwing confetti, video of you in action, or a professional portrait done by a colleague, make sure it matches your personality. If you never shoot in black and white, your portrait shouldn’t be. Don’t do a corporate headshot if you are a roll in the mud/get dirty kind of artist. Your portrait (and ultimately your entire being) is an extension of your brand – make it easy for viewers to see what you are all about. 

 

We don’t need to know your whole self right away…

 

Every artist has a “when I first picked up a camera” story, but that doesn’t mean you have to tell it. Okay, a little harsh I know, but your about page should hold a concise message that tells your story without giving away all the spoilers of your autobiography. 

For example, although I got my first camera when I was two years old, you do not need to know the stories about me taking blurry pictures of my parents cause I couldn’t stand up without wobbling. Instead, I start my artist story in 4th grade, when I won first place in an art competition for Photoshopping my sister’s face on my pet mastiff. The piece was titled “My Favorite Things.” 

In those quick two sentences I told you about my early start in the arts, I like dogs, have a sister, and a sense of humor. Cut out the segways and get to the good stuff. Clients do not have a lot of time to spend on your website and will make a decision if they like you after the first few sentences, so utilize their attention wisely and creatively. 

 

It’s not always all about you… 

 

While I always love to know what your favorite color is, your about page can also be a great place to hint toward what working with you would be like. Especially for wedding and portrait sessions, giving the viewer a glimpse of expectation of a shoot will help form confidence in not only your ability to create great images, but the art of making a subject comfortable in front of a camera. 

Testimonials, behind the scenes videos, or clear “what to expect” guides will make your soon to be client excited and gravitate toward working with you. Just because we have the same camera equipment, does not mean our sets run the same – show that off and you will connect with like minded people.

 

Direct viewers toward the next step – hiring you! 

 

They read about your mom, plants, favorite movie, and now want to work with you – don’t let them wander off on their own! No matter how clear you think your website is, everyone needs a hand to hold when it involves making decisions that will cost them money. Leave a clear call to action at the bottom of the page that links to your contact information or social pages. Do not give them an excuse of why they didn’t inquire about your work or services, make it easy.

 

Check out examples from a few Snapwire Creator’s websites to get inspired: 

 

Eno Adoghe // enoadoghe.com

photography resume

Joni Schrantz // jonischrantz.com

photographer resume

Christopher Ried // christophercreatesphotography.com

photographer resume

Rachel Hanon // rachelhanon.com

photographer resume

Lauren Scott // laurenscottstudios.com

photographer resume

David Cabrera //davidcjphotography.com

photographer resume

 

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